But will Wallace & Gromit read it?

I keep meaning to update my blogroll and one of the blogs that I’ll be adding is Green Gathering by Ian Green of Green PR (also based in Wakefield). Ian has just announced that he’s launched a new corporate blog on behalf of client Wenselydale cheese (of Wallace & Gromit fame).

First impressions are that it looks really good. The blog is partly to support the campaign to support the submission for Protected Designation of Origin for real Yorkshire cheese.

There are one or two things that I would have done differently. One is that the Terms & Conditions look like they have been written by lawyers to apply to a traditional website and not a blog. I’m sure they don’t really mean “nor should you establish a link to any part of our site other than the home/holding page.” Saying “You may link to our home page” isn’t very social media, but is almost certainly down to lawyers not understanding rather than Ian and the good folk at Green PR.

Another is that I’d tidy up Ian’s biography to make it clear that he works for a PR company and not Wenselydale Creamery. I’d also add a blog policy to explain what sort of comments are welcome and what isn’t.

Finally it’s a relief to see that even experienced hacks like Ian don’t proof their blog entries properly “support our submission submission for” – it’s not just me!

Actually that’s quite an important point. At BMA PR we make sure that news releases, articles etc are quality controlled and proofed by another member of the team, but blog entries are published without the same level of checking.

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About Stuart Bruce

International communications consultant and PR trainer specialising in online public affairs, digital corporate communications, online PR and social media; frequent national media commentator and conference speaker.
  • http://www.greencomms.com Ian Green

    Stuart,
    Thanks for the posting. We're feeling our way here to an extent and I suspect that the blog will evolve over time as we better understand what users have to say about it. For instance we need to add an RSS feed so people can subscribe to the blog. Trackbacks might be handy too – we've taken advice from Simon Collister.
    What I have found really encouraging is that the client has been so enthusiastic about it and really embraced the concept of having an open dialogue with their customers or anyone else who cares to look at it.
    The legal aspect does smack at Belt'n'Braces but we have adopted a policy that all comments and postings will be published regardless of their views.
    We actually spotted "submission" but you got their before us. You're right on proofing – our policy is nothing leaves the office with out it going through three pairs of eyes. Blogging is a lot less vigorous – is that part of the appeal?
    For more on this check out The Silent H at Dilbert's Blog

  • http://www.joannatidball.com joanna

    The simplicity of publishing a blog entry definitely makes it easy to skip over the proofing / checking stage, but I think that making time for quality control checks – for grammar, spelling and link-checking – is a very good habit to get into. Although the tone taken in blog entries is likely to be much more informal and conversational than in, say, a news release or article, I think it's still important to maintain the high quality of writing that you'd apply to these other types of content.

    When I'm commenting on a blog entry, I much prefer it when there's a 'preview' feature (like you have here) so that I can give my comment the once-over and (hopefully) avoid any glaring errors!