Sir Tim Berners-Lee pops Web 2.0 bubble

PC Pro reports that Sir Tim Berners-Lee has debunked the hype around Web 2.0 by insisting that what it purports to be is exactly what he intended the web to be when he first conceived it.

And so say I.


About Stuart Bruce

International communications consultant and PR trainer specialising in online public affairs, digital corporate communications, online PR and social media; frequent national media commentator and conference speaker.
  • http://twopointouch.com Ian Delaney

    It's just a label, to be sure, much like (*looks left*) "The New PR".

    PS. cf. Techcrunch UK. The PC Pro story is over a month old. Breaking news indeed.

  • http://leverwealth.blogspot.com David Phillips

    Well….. The simplification of the W3C standard to XML was a big step that gave the semantic web a real shot in the arm so I think there is a new dynamic but he is right we could have managed without it.

    What is so difficult to understand is that social, political and economic commentators have not realised the big shift that has taken place.

    The very structure of relationships and coalitions inside and outside 'organisations' is different.

    The nature of 'tangible' is much less 'solid than it was. Knowledge has moved away outside the gate.

    The actualitie is that there is no such person as a CEO (or any other 'leader'), just a coalition such a person might maintain for a short while before the next coalition takes up the relationship mantle.

    It is this that the Web has achieved and most people don't want to see it even if Amazon.com has shown how for a decade.

  • http://profile.typekey.com/stuartbrucepr/ Stuart Bruce – Wolfstar

    Ian, not sure if you know but the Delivering the New PR is the fourth in a series that started last November. Several of the speakers, including Microsoft's Tom Murphy and myself, soundly debunk the 'New PR' myth.

    Well spotted on the PC Pro story date.

  • http://twopointouch.com Ian Delaney

    Sorry – my previous comment looks a little hostile with hindsight. It wasn't intended as such, believe me.
    I'm coming round myself to the idea of Web 2.0 being analagous to an art movement. We can't say precisely where it starts and ends, but we can identify traits, methods, schools, forerunners and leading practitioners.