Edelman apologises

Not much more needs to be said.

Richard Edelman apologises for the mistake.

Steve Rubel explains it takes time for processes to work.

More or less what I said earlier today. At least one PR blogger recognised the value of Edelman “pushing the envelope” (although that phrase is almost as bad and 80s as ‘running it up the pole to see how it flies’ and isn’t normally one that I’d expect Tom Murphy to use).

Well done guys, keep trying harder. That’s all we can all do.


About Stuart Bruce

International communications consultant and PR trainer specialising in online public affairs, digital corporate communications, online PR and social media; frequent national media commentator and conference speaker.
  • http://profile.typekey.com/steverubel/ Steve Rubel

    Thank you!

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  • http://www.tpemurphy.com/blog Tom Murphy

    Stuart,

    You made me laugh this morning!

    Mea culpa, I didn't even notice the phrase until you rightly pointed it out!

    I must try harder!
    TM

  • http://www.wagnercomm.blogspot.com John Wagner

    Well done, guys?? Really?

    Richard Edelman did not "apologize." He simply said his firm made a mistake by not ensuring the two bloggers used their last names.

    That's a far cry from apologizing, and a far cry from ensuring that future efforts will be based upon transparency. The two bloggers on the Wal-Mart site were professional journalists, being compensated to travel the country in an RV provided by the company, and one of them was a relative of a member of the Wal-Mart team at Edelman.

    None of that was disclosed on the blog until the whole thing blew up.

    But the good news is that next time there is a fake Wal-Mart blog, the authors will use their last names.

  • http://strumpette.com Amanda Chapel

    Stu… you are 100 percent wrong on this one.

    We call for their resignation… and for good reason. See http://www.strumpette.com/archives/206-Call-Goes-Out-for-Edelman-and-Rubel-to-Resign.html

    When the industry loses shame, we're doomed.

    - Amanda

  • http://pekingduck.org richard

    Richard's "apology" was terse, unrepentant and remorse-free. It was something he had to do, but at this point it's the equivalent of inserting one's finger in the about-to-burst dyke. He deserves zero credit, as he simply had no choice, and if the sky hadn't been falling there'd have been no mea culpa. To position oneself as the world's guru on corporate blogging and blog ethics/transparency, and then to dive head-first into this cesspool puts an irreversible stain on Richard Edelman's and his firm's reputation and blows to bits any claims the agency might have of being a pioneer in corporate blogging. All the vainglorious pronouncements Edelman has made in the past on transparency and integrity are exposed for what they are – empty phrases, full of sound and fury and signifying less than nothing. Had he really taken a stand in his post and truly sought to explore how and why this was allowed to happen maybe the world would be more forgiving. Sadly, he chose the "holding statement" approach, where you tell as little as possible and hope the world will forget and move on to other things. Shameful.

  • http://www.wagnercomm.blogspot.com/ John Wagner

    Well done, guys?? Really?

    Richard Edelman did not "apologize." He simply said his firm made a mistake by not ensuring the two bloggers used their last names.

    That's a far cry from apologizing, and a far cry from ensuring that future efforts will be based upon transparency. The two bloggers on the Wal-Mart site were professional journalists, being compensated to travel the country in an RV provided by the company, and one of them was a relative of a member of the Wal-Mart team at Edelman.

    None of that was disclosed on the blog until the whole thing blew up.

    But the good news is that next time there is a fake Wal-Mart blog, the authors will use their last names.