Journalist asks the questions, can PRs provide the answer?

Nick Booth is a freelance IT journalist who has come up with a novel use for a blog by using it as a research portal to ask questions about features he is writing. The idea is that PRs can provide answers and quotes in the comments, but because they can see what others have already provided they won’t just provide the same, similar old stuff.

It’s an interesting idea and I’m certainly willing to give it a go, although I suspect some PRs won’t be comfortable about seeing their ‘pitches’ on public display for criticism (and praise?).

 


About Stuart Bruce

International communications consultant and PR trainer specialising in online public affairs, digital corporate communications, online PR and social media; frequent national media commentator and conference speaker.
  • http://www.pr-squared.com Todd Defren

    I talked about a similar idea a while back… it is intriguing!

    http://www.pr-squared.com/2006/09/tag_youre_pitched.html

  • http://www.artisanmc.co.uk Rob Baker

    I am quite happy, in the main, to post my clients' comments on a blog. Afterall, the communication industry and especially online PR is all about this concept. If it is of a sensitive nature, it will be possible to read the request adn e-mail teh reply.

    My only doubt is if I can find the request for information on Response Source or an advanced features listing why go to a blog? Yes, a blog is free, but how do I find the requests and where is the time to search?

    For it to work a journalist must ensure that such requests are regular and that he promotes this particular use of his blog in a number of ways if it is to be of interest to a PR and more importantly found.

    There are so many blogs vying for your time, a journalists blog must offer something more: a chance to engage with a journalist; interesting opportunities for coverage and an insight into the journalists' world.