6

Social media campaign hammers the Daily Mail

Daily Mail gypsy poll

The Daily Mail is running an online poll that is shocking even by Daily Mail standards. It’s asking ‘Should the NHS allow gypsies to jump the queue? A Twitter campaign has sprung into action urging people to vote the right way, which means that at the moment the result is YES 93%, which given the leading question isn’t the hate filled answer the Daily Mail was looking for. I’m surprised the Mail hasn’t pulled the poll yet and it will be interesting to see how it covers the story and if rival papers pick up on it.

It’s an excellent example of just how effective a social media campaign can be.

Stuart Bruce

International Public Relations Adviser | Trainer | Author | Media Commentator | Conference Speaker | University Lecturer | Online PR | Digital Corporate Communications | Crisis Communications | Digital Public Affairs

6 Comments

  1. It will be interesting to see how it covers it..my bet is that it will simply ignore it.

    But calling it a "social media campaign" or even a "Twitter campaign" is a little grand. Twas just a couple of hours of retweeting.

    A small victory for a very small amount of effort.

  2. This isn’t a real poll! It’s a Daily Mail branding exercise; product positioning in the minds of its audience. The people taking this poll are at the Daily Mail website because they have the website bookmarked. There’s no illusion about their political/social makeup. It’s like asking ‘should chicken farming be banned?’ on a vegetarian website. That’s why they don’t bother to report the ‘results’. And with regard to campaign effectiveness sure, if such polls are picked up by other publishers with different audience bias newsworthiness may grow under more heated opinion exchange. Social media can certainly facilitate a war of opinion very quickly, but only if the poll is fed into the right channels. It’s a matter of ‘know your audience’ and ‘know where they are’.

  3. This isn’t a real poll! It’s a Daily Mail branding exercise; product positioning in the minds of its audience. The people taking this poll are at the Daily Mail website because they have the website bookmarked. There’s no illusion about their political/social makeup. It’s like asking ‘should chicken farming be banned?’ on a vegetarian website. That’s why they don’t bother to report the ‘results’. And with regard to campaign effectiveness sure, if such polls are picked up by other publishers with different audience bias newsworthiness may grow under more heated opinion exchange. Social media can certainly facilitate a war of opinion very quickly, but only if the poll is fed into the right channels. It’s a matter of ‘know your audience’ and ‘know where they are’.

Comments are closed.